Join Our Campaign

media

Climate Flip-Flopper Romney Attacks Gingrich on Climate Flip-Flop

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Kate Geller, (202) 785-8683 or kate_geller@lcv.org

14 Dec 2011  |  Mike Palamuso

WASHINGTON – Just hours after picking up the endorsement of failed Senate candidate and climate change denier Christine O’Donnell, Mitt Romney is launching a new attack against Newt Gingrich’s past support for climate action, conveniently ignoring Romney’s own laudable efforts to cap global warming pollution as governor of Massachusetts. The Romney campaign today launched http://newtandnancy.com.

“Mitt Romney attacking Newt Gingrich for climate flip-flops is like Kim Kardashian giving marriage advice,” said Navin Nayak, LCV Senior Vice President of Campaigns.

Romney’s Climate Flip-Flops:

 Governor Romney believed that climate change was impacted by human activity.  Even last summer, he repeated this stance.

While announcing more investment in renewable energy in 2003, Governor Romney said: "I think the global warming debate is now pretty much over and people recognize the need associated with providing sources which do not generate the heat that is currently provided by fossil fuels."  [Cape Cod Times, 3/14/03]

 

At a June town hall, Romney said that “humans contribute.” "I can't prove that, but I believe based on what I read that the world is getting warmer . . . I believe that humans contribute to that. I don't know how much our contribution is to that, because I know that there have been periods of greater heat and warmth in the past, but I believe we contribute to that."  [Washington Post, 6/8/11]

Presidential candidate Romney questioned whether human activity played a part in climate change.

On a campaign stop in Pittsburgh, Romney said: “My view is that we don’t know what’s causing climate change on this planet. And the idea of spending trillions and trillions of dollars to try to reduce CO2 emissions is not the right course for us.”  [Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh, 10/27/11 via ThinkProgress, 10/28/11]

Romney told the Des Moines Register in December that scientists wouldn’t determine the impact of human activities on climate change until “10, 20, 50 years from now.” [ThinkProgress, 12/9/11]

 

Governor Romney put limits on harmful carbon emissions.

As part of Governor Romney’s Massachusetts Climate Protection Plan, the state set stricter limits on carbon emissions from power plants.  Romney said: “Massachusetts continues to be committed to improving air quality for all our citizens. These carbon emission limits will provide real and immediate progress in the battle to improve our environment…They help us accomplish our environmental goals while protecting jobs and the economy.”  [Massachusetts Office of the Governor, 12/7/05]

 

 

Presidential candidate Romney doesn’t think carbon emissions should be regulated.

While campaigning for president this past summer, Romney downplayed the danger of carbon emissions.  According to Politico: “Mitt Romney says he doesn’t think carbon pollution threatens human health and would not green-light EPA climate regulations if he were in the White House…"I think we may have made a mistake," Romney said Thursday in response to a voter's question about EPA regulating air pollution from coal plants under the Clean Air Act. "We have made a mistake is what I believe, in saying that the EPA should regulate carbon emissions. I don’t think that was the intent of the original legislation, and I don’t think carbon is a pollutant in the sense of harming our bodies.’” [Politico, 7/18/11]

Romney repeated this stance in November: “Now I know there is also a movement to say that carbon dioxide should be guided or should be managed by the Environmental Protection Agency. I disagree with that…I exhale carbon dioxide…I don’t want those guys following me around with a meter to see if I’m breathing too hard.” [Politico, 11/18/11]

Governor Romney initially supported a regional agreement to limit carbon emissions.

In 2005, Romney spoke positively of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, declaring “This is a great thing for the Commonwealth…We can effectively create incentives to help stimulate a sector of the economy and at the same time not kill jobs." He added that the pact would be “good business.” [Boston Globe, 11/8/05]

Romney pulled out of the regional agreement and, as a presidential candidate, opposed a national cap and trade program.

In late 2005, Romney pulled out of RGGI. [Washington Post, 6/9/11]

Romney wrote in his 2011 autobiography, "I do not support radical feel-good politics like a unilateral U.S. cap-and-trade mandate."  [Washington Post, 6/9/11]

Governor Romney cracked down on dirty coal plants.

In a speech declaring new standards for coal plants, Romney said: “I will not create jobs or hold jobs that kill people. And that plant kills people and PG&E has been given a notice to have it cleaned up by 2004 and they have thumbed their nose at the people of Massachusetts and Salem Harbor by not cleaning it up on time. So we’re saying, clean it up on time, do the job in the community, invest in cleaning technology.”  [ThinkProgress, 5/20/11]

 

Presidential candidate Romney wants to block the EPA from regulating carbon emissions from coal plants.

While campaigning for president this past summer, Romney downplayed the danger of carbon emissions.  According to Politico: “Mitt Romney says he doesn’t think carbon pollution threatens human health and would not green-light EPA climate regulations if he were in the White House…"I think we may have made a mistake," Romney said Thursday in response to a voter's question about EPA regulating air pollution from coal plants under the Clean Air Act. "We have made a mistake is what I believe, in saying that the EPA should regulate carbon emissions. I don’t think that was the intent of the original legislation, and I don’t think carbon is a pollutant in the sense of harming our bodies.’” [Politico, 7/18/11]

Governor Romney created tougher emissions standards for more fuel efficient cars.

In 2005, Governor Romney instituted stricter emissions standards.  According to the Boston Globe: “But as governor, Romney imposed tough emissions standards in December 2005 that added Massachusetts to a growing list of states seeking to force the auto industry to produce cleaner-burning cars – which automakers considered a back-door attempt to raise fuel standards. Under the rules, cars sold in the state after 2015 must emit 30 percent less carbon dioxide, 20 percent fewer toxic pollutants, and as much as 20 percent fewer smog-causing pollutants than under federal standards.” [Boston Globe, 1/15/08]

 

2008 presidential candidate Romney opposed new fuel efficiency standards.

In 2008, Romney slammed fuel standards proposed by President Bush.  The Boston Globe reported: “In a speech to business leaders and at an international auto show, he was especially critical of new fuel efficiency standards signed into law last month by President Bush. ‘Instead of throwing over a life preserver, Washington has dropped yet another anvil on Michigan,’ Romney told the Detroit Economic Club. ‘And now it's passively sitting back to see if car companies can swim, and the answer is: just barely.’”  …Seth Kaplan, vice president at the Conservation Law Foundation, a Boston environmental group, said the standards were tougher on automakers than the federal standards Romney is now decrying in Michigan.’ The positions are inconsistent, to put it mildly,’ Kaplan said yesterday. He added that rather than bemoan the rules as a burden on business, Romney officials had praised them as a "significant step in cleaning our air.”  [Boston Globe, 1/15/08]



Powered by Convio
nonprofit software