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Scorecard

1. Land and Water Conservation Fund

Representative Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) offered this amendment to H.R. 1, the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, to cut by 90% the bill’s already minimal allocation for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), which is funded by oil royalties and helps expand protected lands and fund local projects such as city parks. The LWCF has provided critical funding for some of the most cherished places in our nation, from the Grand Canyon to Gettysburg National Military Park to Mount Rainier National Park. On February 16, the House rejected the Lummis amendment by a vote of 213-216 (House roll call vote 61). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE.

2. Holding Government Accountable

Representative Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) offered this amendment to H.R. 1, the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, to block implementation of the Equal Access to Justice Act, a critical statute signed into law by President Reagan. The law, which gives Americans the right to recover attorney fees if they prevail in court, has helped hold federal agencies accountable when they violate environmental, health, and safety laws. On February 17, the House adopted the Lummis amendment by a vote of 232-197 (House roll call vote 85). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. Fortunately, the language in this amendment was not included in the compromise appropriations bill that funded the government through the end of FY11, H.R. 1473, which the president signed into law on April 15.

3. Offshore Drilling Subsidies

House Natural Resources Committee Ranking Member Ed Markey (D-MA) offered this amendment to H.R. 1, the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, to eliminate up to $53 billion in taxpayer subsidies by closing a royalty payment loophole for oil companies operating offshore. At a time when many Americans are struggling to make ends meet, this amendment would prevent some of the world's biggest and most profitable oil companies from drilling for free on publicly owned resources. On February 18, the House rejected the Markey amendment by a vote of 174-251 (House roll call vote 109). YES IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE.

4. Off-Road Vehicles in National Forests

Representative Wally Herger (R-CA) offered this amendment to H.R. 1, the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, to halt implementation of off-road vehicle management plans in our national forests. During the George W. Bush administration, the Forest Service named unmanaged off-road vehicle use as one of the four greatest threats to our forests and grasslands. On February 18, the House adopted the Herger amendment by a vote of 227-197 (House roll call vote 113). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. Fortunately, the language in this amendment was not included in the compromise appropriations bill that funded the government through the end of FY11, H.R. 1473, which the president signed into law on April 15.

5.The Chesapeake Bay

Representative Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) offered this amendment to H.R. 1, the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, to block efforts to continue the clean-up of the treasured Chesapeake Bay. It would prohibit funding to implement measures that limit the amount of allowable pollution in waters that wind up in the bay. On February 18, the House adopted the Goodlatte amendment by a vote of 230-195 (House roll call vote 120). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. Fortunately, the language in this amendment was not included in the compromise appropriations bill that funded the government through the end of FY11, H.R. 1473, which the president signed into law on April 15.

6. Florida’s Water Quality

Representative Tom Rooney (R-FL) offered this amendment to H.R. 1, the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, to block the EPA from implementing new water quality standards to prevent toxic green slime from polluting Florida’s lakes, rivers, and streams—rules that were issued in November 2010. This amendment would also halt public education about protecting waters from excess pollution from sewage and fertilizer, and set a dangerous precedent for efforts to reduce water contamination across the country, including in the Mississippi River basin and the Gulf of Mexico. On February 18, the House adopted the Rooney amendment by a vote of 237-189 (House roll call vote 123). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. Fortunately, the language in this amendment was not included in the compromise appropriations bill that funded the government through the end of FY11, H.R. 1473, which the president signed into law on April 15.

7. Clean Water Safeguards

Representative David McKinley (R-WV) offered this amendment to H.R. 1, the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, to prevent the EPA from continuing to use its authority under the Clean Water Act to prohibit or restrict projects that would have an “unacceptable adverse effect” on water, fish, and wildlife. The EPA has reserved this authority for extraordinarily environmentally-destructive projects, using it only 13 times in the entire 39-year history of the Clean Water Act. On February 19, the House adopted the McKinley amendment by a vote of 240-182 (House roll call vote 135). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. Fortunately, the language in this amendment was not included in the compromise appropriations bill that funded the government through the end of FY11, H.R. 1473, which the president signed into law on April 15.

8. National Monuments

Representative Dean Heller (R-NV) offered this amendment to H.R. 1, the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, to eliminate the president’s powers under the Antiquities Act to designate new national monuments. The Antiquities Act, signed by Republican President Theodore Roosevelt, gives presidents the authority to protect federal lands for the benefit of future generations. Presidents from both parties have used the authority to designate national monuments. On February 19, the House rejected the Heller amendment by a vote of 209-213 (House roll call vote 139). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE.

9. Sweeping Environmental Funding and Policy Assault (H.R. 1)

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers sponsored H.R. 1, the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act of 2011, which at the time of House passage was the greatest legislative assault ever on the environment and public health, including massive funding cuts and policy assaults on our air, water, wildlife, and wild places. On February 19, the House passed H.R. 1 by a vote of 235-189 (House roll call vote 147). On March 9, the Senate rejected H.R. 1 (Senate roll call vote 36). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. The Obama administration and Senate leadership subsequently stood strong in negotiations with the House and insisted that most—but not all—of the anti-environmental riders from H.R. 1 be dropped before agreeing to the final compromise bill, H.R. 1473, which the president signed into law on April 15.

10. Pesticides Pollution

Representative Bob Gibbs (R-OH) sponsored H.R. 872, the so-called Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act of 2011, to prevent the EPA from protecting our waterways from the discharge of toxic pesticides that can contaminate drinking water, severely harm fish, and work their way up the food chain. More than 1,000 U.S. waterways are already impaired by pesticides. This legislation would remove the EPA’s tools under the Clean Water Act to control this pollution, instead relying on a weak federal pesticides law that demonstrably fails to protect our waters now. On March 31, the House passed a motion to suspend the rules and pass H.R. 872 by a vote of 292-130 (House roll call vote 206). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. H.R. 872 was reported out of the Senate Agriculture Committee on June 21, but the full Senate has taken no action on this legislation.

11. Global Warming Pollution

House Energy & Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton (R-MI) crafted H.R. 910, the so-called Energy Tax Prevention Act of 2011, to legislatively repeal a scientific finding by the EPA that greenhouse gases endanger human health and the environment, to permanently block the EPA from regulating greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act, and to undermine fuel economy standards. This harmful bill would jeopardize public health and the environment, and increase the nation’s dangerous dependence on oil. On April 7, the House passed H.R. 910 by a vote of 255-172 (House roll call vote 249). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. Just one day earlier, on April 6, the Senate rejected four amendments to weaken, delay, or block the EPA’s ability to reduce greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act, including the McConnell amendment (Senate roll call vote 54) that was identical to H.R. 910. At the end of 2011, the EPA’s ability to regulate greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act remained firmly intact.

12. Offshore Drilling Safety Reforms

House Natural Resources Committee Ranking Member Ed Markey (D-MA) offered this amendment to H.R. 1229, the so-called Putting the Gulf of Mexico Back to Work Act, to implement basic offshore drilling safety reforms recommended by the independent commission tasked with investigating the causes of the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill and recommending oversight reforms. The amendment would result in common-sense reforms that still have not been codified into law following the greatest environmental disaster in our nation’s history. On May 10, the House rejected the Markey amendment by a vote of 176-237 (House roll call vote 301). YES IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE.

13. Weakening Offshore Drilling Oversight

House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (R-WA) sponsored H.R. 1229, the so-called Putting the Gulf of Mexico Back to Work Act, which would expand offshore drilling and make it more dangerous by enacting oversight standards that are weaker than those that were in place before the catastrophic 2010 Gulf oil spill disaster, which tragically killed eleven workers, wreaked havoc on the Gulf Coast’s fishing and tourism industries, and damaged coastal and marine ecosystems. The legislation would impose a rushed and arbitrary time period of just 30 days for the Interior Secretary to approve or deny drilling permits, and it would grant automatic approval if no action is taken within 60 days. On May 11, the House passed H.R. 1229 by a vote of 263-163 (House roll call vote 309). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. While the Senate has taken no formal action on H.R. 1229, much of the bill’s language was included in S. 953, the so-called Offshore Production and Safety Act of 2011, which the Senate rejected on a procedural vote on May 18 (Senate roll call vote 73).

14. Offshore Drilling Expansion

House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (R-WA) sponsored H.R. 1231, the Reversing President Obama’s Offshore Moratorium Act, a radical piece of legislation that would throw open most of America’s coastline to dangerous offshore drilling. It would ensure that drilling occurs off the beaches of the entire East Coast down to North Carolina, the Southern California coast, and in the Arctic Ocean and Alaska’s salmon-rich Bristol Bay—regardless of whether a state objects to such drilling. On May 12, the House passed H.R. 1231 by a vote of 243-179 (House roll call vote 320). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. The Senate has taken no action on this legislation.

15. Border Fence Environmental Mitigation

Representative Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) offered this amendment to H.R. 2017, the FY12 Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Appropriations bill, to remove a critical provision that would have allowed the transfer of funds from the DHS to the Department of the Interior to mitigate the adverse environmental impacts associated with border security projects. These projects include the construction of a border fence, which slices through national monuments, wildlife refuges, and other critical public lands, and threatens numerous imperiled species—such as jaguars, ocelots, bighorn sheep, and Sonoran pronghorn—by fragmenting their natural habitat. On June 2, the House adopted the Lummis amendment by a vote of 238-177 (House roll call vote 391). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. regrettably, the language authorizing the transfer of funds was not included in the compromise fy12 omnibus appropriations bill, h.r. 2055, which the president signed into law on December 23.

16. Climate Change Adaptation

Representative Steve Scalise (R-LA) offered this amendment to H.R. 2112, the FY12 Agriculture Appropriations bill, to bar the Department of Agriculture from implementing its climate change adaptation plan. Our nation’s food sources and forests are threatened by the increased severity and variability of climate and weather-related events. The Agriculture Department is working with farmers, the agriculture industry, and forest managers to prepare for these threats and to develop better farming and forestry practices to help reduce the negative impacts of climate change. On June 16, the House adopted the Scalise amendment by a vote of 238-179 (House roll call vote 448). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. Fortunately, the language in this amendment was not included in the compromise appropriations bill that funded the Department of Agriculture and several other departments through the end of FY12, H.R. 2112, which the president signed into law on November 18.

17. Offshore Drilling Air Pollution

Representative Cory Gardner (R-CO) sponsored H.R. 2021, the so-called Jobs and Energy Permitting Act of 2011, which would allow oil companies to sidestep critical Clean Air Act protections and avoid common-sense air pollution limits on their offshore drilling operations. The bill would exempt these companies from requirements to apply available pollution control technology to vessels involved in offshore drilling, and waive permit reviews by the EPA’s Environmental Appeals Board. On June 22, the House passed H.R. 2021 by a vote of 253-166 (House roll call vote 478). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. Unfortunately, language with a similar goal of giving oil companies a free pass to pollute was included in the compromise FY12 omnibus appropriations bill, H.R. 2055, which the president signed into law on December 23. This language moves responsibility for Arctic offshore drilling air pollution permitting from the EPA to the Department of the Interior—in effect, exempting the industry from the Clean Air Act’s health-based national ambient air quality standards and the Act’s program to prevent significant deterioration of air quality.

18. Clean Water Protections

Representative Jim Moran (D-VA) offered this amendment to H.R. 2354, the FY12 Energy and Water Appropriations bill, to strike a provision in the underlying bill prohibiting the EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from restoring longstanding Clean Water Act protections for small streams, headwaters, and wetlands that Americans depend on for swimming, fishing, and drinking, as well as for protection against flooding. On July 12, the House rejected the Moran amendment by a vote of 170-250 (House roll call vote 540). YES IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. While the Moran amendment was defeated, the anti-environmental provision it sought to strike was fortunately not included in the compromise FY12 omnibus appropriations bill, H.R. 2055, which the president signed into law on December 23.

19. Flood Insurance Reform

Representative Judy Biggert (R-IL) sponsored H.R. 1309, the Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2011, which would take a much-needed step toward reforming the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and protecting sensitive environmental habitats. While the existing NFIP provides flood insurance at a significantly discounted rate—thereby creating a market incentive that has encouraged development and destruction of floodplains—H.R. 1309 would remedy this by increasing current rates to market-based levels. The bill would also create a $90 million per year mitigation fund to help relocate communities out of floodplains, and create a Technical Mapping Advisory Council that would, among other things, ensure that changing weather and altered hydrology are included in the assessment of risk. On July 12, the House passed H.R. 1309 by a vote of 406-22 (House roll call vote 562). YES IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. The Senate Banking committee unanimously reported a companion bill (S. 1940) on December 15, which is currently awaiting consideration by the full Senate.

20. Light Bulb Energy Efficiency Standards

Representative Joe Barton (R-TX) introduced H.R. 2417, the deceptively titled Better Use of Light Bulbs Act, which would eliminate common-sense energy-efficiency standards for light bulbs. These standards passed with strong bipartisan and industry support and were signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2007. H.R. 2417 would roll back the financial and public health benefits of these standards, which will provide billions of dollars in savings for American families and energy savings equivalent to the energy provided by 30 large power plants, reducing harmful pollution. On July 12, a House vote to suspend the rules and pass the bill with a two-thirds majority failed on a 233-193 vote (House roll call vote 563). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. Unfortunately, language that prohibits the Department of Energy from using funding to implement or enforce the light bulb energy efficiency standards was included in the compromise FY12 omnibus appropriations bill, H.R. 2055, which the president signed into law on December 23.

21. Dirty Water Act

House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman John Mica (R-FL) sponsored H.R. 2018, the misnamed Clean Water Cooperative Federalism Act of 2011, which is a blatant assault on the Clean Water Act and on waterways Americans depend on for swimming, fishing, and drinking. Despite overwhelming public support for clean water, the bill would cripple the EPA’s ability to set a minimum “floor” for a state’s water quality standards, blocking the agency’s ability to limit pollution flowing downstream to other waters and also into other states. Further, the bill would allow the destruction of critical water habitat and gut the Clean Water Act provisions that protect streams, wetlands, and other bodies of water from harmful large-scale mining and other destructive projects. On July 13, the House passed H.R. 2018 by a vote of 239-184 (House roll call vote 573). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. The Senate has taken no action on this legislation.

22. Gulf Coast Restoration

Representative Steve Scalise (R-LA) offered this amendment to H.R. 2354, the FY12 Energy and Water Appropriations bill, to boost funding by $1 million for coastal Louisiana restoration projects by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The amendment would allow for the start of new projects to help restore the wetlands, fish, and wildlife of the Gulf Coast region, which have been degraded over the years by agricultural run-off, hurricanes, and disasters like the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. On July 15, the House adopted the Scalise amendment by a vote of 271-148 (House roll call vote 590). YES IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. Unfortunately, the language in the Scalise amendment was not included in the compromise FY12 omnibus appropriations bill, H.R. 2055, which the president signed into law on December 23.

23. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Representative Paul Broun (R-GA) offered this amendment to H.R. 2354, the FY12 Energy and Water Appropriations bill, to eliminate funding for the Department of Energy’s energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. Investing in these technologies creates jobs, saves consumers money on their energy bills, and reduces harmful pollution associated with dirty energy production. On July 15, the House rejected the Broun amendment by a vote of 69-354 (House roll call vote 591). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE.

24. Environmental Funding

Representative Tim Huelskamp (R-KS) offered this amendment to H.R. 2584, the FY12 Interior and Environment Appropriations bill, to cut spending in the bill by over $3 billion, a more than 10% cut from the underlying bill, which already represents a major spending reduction from the previous year’s bill. The amendment takes a drastic approach to its proposed cuts that would drastically slash spending from a slew of critical conservation agencies such as the Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Park Service, as well as from environmental programs such as the Clean Water State Revolving Funds and the Drinking Water State Revolving Funds. On July 25, the House rejected the Huelskamp amendment by a vote of 126-284 (House roll call vote 633). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE.

25. Keystone XL Tar Sands Pipeline

Representative Lee Terry (R-NE) sponsored H.R. 1938, the misnamed North American-Made Energy Security Act, to rush a decision on whether to grant a presidential permit to build the Keystone XL pipeline across six states in order to carry tar sands—the dirtiest oil on the planet—from Canada’s boreal forest to an international shipping port in Texas. This pipeline would threaten the environment with far more global warming pollution than conventional crude oil and jeopardize surrounding communities, ecosystems, and watersheds. On July 26, the House passed H.R. 1938 by a vote of 279-147 (House roll call vote 650). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. On November 10, the Obama administration announced that it intended to conduct additional review and would not make a final decision on the permit until the first quarter of 2013. Republican leaders in Congress subsequently insisted on including language to force a decision within 60 days in H.R. 3765, the Temporary Payroll Tax Cut Continuation Act of 2011, which the president signed into law on December 23. The Obama administration rejected the permit on January 18, 2012.

26. Endangered Species Act

House Appropriations Committee Ranking Member Norm Dicks (D-WA) and Representative Mike Fitzpatrick (R-PA) offered this amendment to H.R. 2584, the FY12 Interior and Environment Appropriations bill, to strike a rider in the underlying bill prohibiting the Fish and Wildlife Service from spending any money to list new plants and animals under the Endangered Species Act, designate critical habitat, or upgrade species from threatened to endangered. This Extinction Rider—a direct assault on the Endangered Species Act, which has prevented the extinction of listed species such as the American alligator and the grizzly bear—would boost the risk of extinction for hundreds of imperiled plants and animals, and it would immediately block life-saving protections for more than 260 “candidate species” that are currently awaiting listing decisions, such as the wolverine, Rio Grande cutthroat trout, and Pacific walrus. On July 27, the House adopted the Dicks-Fitzpatrick amendment by a vote of 224-202 (House roll call vote 652). YES IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE.

27. Gutting Public Health Basis of the Clean Air Act

Representative Bob Latta (R-OH) offered this amendment to H.R. 2401, the deceptively titled Transparency in Regulatory Analysis of Impacts on the Nation Act of 2011(TRAIN Act), to eliminate a central underpinning of the Clean Air Act—affirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2001—that clean air standards must be based on what public health science tells us is safe to breathe. This amendment would require the EPA to define healthy air based on the “feasibility and cost” to polluting industries, and would compel the EPA to accept standards that fail to protect public health. On September 23, the House adopted the Latta amendment by a vote of 227-192 (House roll call vote 738). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. The Senate has taken no action on legislation containing language from the Latta amendment.

28. Assault on the Clean Air Act

Representative John Sullivan (R-OK) introduced H.R. 2401, the deceptively titled Transparency in Regulatory Analysis of Impacts on the Nation Act of 2011(TRAIN Act), requiring duplicative, biased, and unnecessary analyses of the costs—but not the benefits—of several EPA public health safeguards. Moreover, through last minute amendments adopted in committee and on the House floor, H.R. 2401 grew into the single biggest assault on the Clean Air Act in its more than 40-year history. This bill would allow for the indefinite delay of two life-saving clean air safeguards (the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule and the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards for power plants), meaning tens of thousands of lives would be lost and hundreds of thousands more asthma attacks would occur from increased air pollution. The bill would also require any future standards to be based on the most polluting power plants, and incorporate the Latta amendment (House roll call vote 738) that eliminates the health-based underpinning of the Clean Air Act. On September 23, the House passed H.R. 2401 by a vote of 249-169 (House roll call vote 741). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. The Senate has not acted on companion legislation, but on November 10, it rejected a Congressional Review Act resolution of disapproval that would have voided the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule, which is one of the two rules targeted by H.R. 2401 (Senate roll call vote 201).

29. Toxic Air Pollution from Cement Plants

Representative John Sullivan (R-OK) sponsored H.R. 2681, the so-called Cement Sector Regulatory Relief Act of 2011, which would toss out already-finalized standards to clean up mercury and other toxic air pollution from cement plants, the second largest industrial emitters of mercury pollution, which can impair a child’s ability to think, talk, read, write, and learn. The bill would delay a new set of standards for at least four and a half years while eliminating any deadline by which cement plants are required to comply with the standards. Every year the standards are delayed would mean an additional 2,500 premature deaths due to cement plants’ harmful emissions. On October 6, the House passed H.R. 2681 by a vote of 262-161 (House roll call vote 764). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. The Senate has taken no action on this legislation.

30. Toxic Air Pollution from Boilers

Representative Morgan Griffith (R-VA) sponsored H.R. 2250, the so-called EPA Regulatory Relief Act of 2011, which would indefinitely delay long-overdue air pollution control standards for industrial boilers and incinerators, which act as small, in-house power plants and emit toxic air pollution including mercury—a potent neurotoxin especially dangerous to pregnant women and children—and cancer-causing dioxins. These facilities are the nation’s third largest source of mercury emissions. Every year these standards are delayed would mean up to an additional 8,100 premature deaths, 52,000 asthma attacks, and 5,100 heart attacks. On October 13, the House passed H.R. 2250 by a vote of 275-142 (House roll call vote 791). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. The Senate has taken no action on H.R. 2250, though numerous Senate bills have been introduced containing language attacking toxic air pollution standards for industrial boilers, including S. 1786, which the Senate rejected on November 3 (Senate roll call vote 196).

31. Coal Ash Pollution

Representative David McKinley (R-WV) sponsored H.R. 2273, the Coal Residuals Reuse and Management Act, which would fail to protect the health of communities from the dangers of coal ash pollution. Coal ash, the toxic byproduct of burning coal that’s laden with arsenic, lead, and other heavy metals, is stored across the country in nearly 700 largely unregulated sludge impoundments. It can be catastrophic when these sludge impoundments fail—such as when more than one billion gallons of ash spilled across 300 acres after a Tennessee dam failed in 2008—and dangerous chemicals can leach from them into water Americans count on. Yet this bill would afford communities fewer protections from these toxic sludge ponds than they currently receive from their local household garbage landfill. On October 14, the House passed H.R. 2273 by a vote of 267-144 (House roll call vote 800). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. The Senate has taken no action on this legislation.

32. Hard Rock Mining

Representative Paul Gosar (R-AZ) introduced H.R. 1904, the deceptively titled Southeast Arizona Land Exchange and Conservation Act, which would transfer lands within the Tonto National Forest to a mining corporation in exchange for the government receiving lower-quality private lands owned by the corporation. The legislation would allow the land exchange to occur without proper environmental review for the large-scale mining operations planned for the area, which is considered a sacred site by Native American tribes and is renowned for its natural beauty. On October 26, the House adopted H.R. 1904 by a vote of 235-186 (House roll call vote 809). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. The Senate has taken no action on this legislation.

33. Controlling Aquatic Invasive Species

House Rules Committee Ranking Member Louise Slaughter (D-NY) introduced this amendment to H.R. 2838, the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2011, to strike a section of the bill that would eliminate the tools used by federal and state officials to limit the introduction of aquatic invasive species from ballast water, which is carried by vessels to add weight and provide stability. Aquatic invasive species are found in states across the country, but they can be particularly problematic in the freshwater Great Lakes, where ballast water discharges are responsible for the introduction of more than 30 percent of the more than 185 invasive species that are currently disrupting the food chain, fouling beaches, and harming infrastructure in the region. On November 4, the House rejected the Slaughter amendment by a vote of 161-237 (House roll call vote 836). YES IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. The House passed H.R. 2838 with the harmful ballast water provisions, while the Senate Commerce Committee on November 2 reported its own Coast Guard authorization bill (S. 1665), which does not include the harmful ballast water provisions. The full Senate has not yet taken action on S. 1655.

34. Regulatory Rollbacks (H.R. 3010)

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-TX) sponsored H.R. 3010, the Regulatory Accountability Act, sweeping legislation that would cripple the rulemaking process by further empowering special interests to effectively stop federal agencies from moving forward with setting basic minimum protections, such as those for Americans’ health and safety. It would override the implementation of existing laws such as the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and the Occupational Safety & Health Act. The bill would add more than 60 additional analyses to an already lengthy and complicated rulemaking process and expands judicial review, thus inviting increased litigation. On December 2, the House passed H.R. 3010 by a vote of 253-167 (House roll call vote 888). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. The Senate has not acted on identical companion legislation; however, on three separate occasions, the Senate rejected proposals that would severely undermine the regulatory process (Senate roll call votes 87, 196, and 202).

35. Regulatory Rollbacks (H.R. 10)

Representative Geoff Davis (R-KY) introduced H.R. 10, the misnamed Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act of 2011 (REINS Act), to require that all major rules receive a joint resolution of approval by Congress, without change, within 70 legislative days. This unnecessary and radical legislation would effectively allow just one chamber of Congress to block enforcement of existing statutory protections ranging from clean air to worker safety. That is a recipe for preventing any new safeguards from being implemented, no matter how necessary they are to protect Americans from emerging threats to their health and safety. On December 7, the House passed H.R. 10 by a vote of 241-184 (House roll call vote 901). NO IS THE PRO-ENVIRONMENT VOTE. While the Senate has taken no formal action on H.R. 10, the upper chamber twice rejected this proposal when it was included in larger bills (Senate roll call votes 196 and 202).



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